5 thoughts on “Ua Mau Ke Ea – Sovereignty Endures Film at Doris Duke Theater in Honolulu

  1. It’s not surprising that many Hawaiians never knew their history unlike me who was raised knowing some of it since I was about 8 years old back in 1951. Many scoffed at me or laughed thinking I was making it up. I was like a voice in the wilderness where none took me seriously. There were other Hawaiians that knew what happened. Both Great-grandmothers whom I personally knew that signed the Ku’e petitions and others revealed what happened to us and early on I put the dots together. As I grew older, I protested against the statehood act and questioned the form of the vote which eliminated the other international options. No one wanted to listen to me. I grew up knowing that I was a Hawaiian subject since I began school. Hawaii Ponoi was known as the Hawaiian National anthem and our flag, our national flag. Our last Queen was Liliuokalani and the Crown Princess was Kaiulani. The U.S. Americans came and took-over our country without our consent. These things I knew as a child. Our voices were just shut out, especially in the news media. I am happy now that more people are learning about our country; and no one is making fun of me.

  2. Aloha Tane, mahalo for your story. I for one am listening and absorbing all that you have to share. No one will ever laugh at you again. I appreciate all that you did and stand for. Rest assured my friend, I and the rest of your countrymen will continue forward until we end this occupation. Imua Imua a lanikila.

  3. Eo!… Mahalo Tane for being there for us…
    At least you knew the TRUTH from an early age and you were
    willing to share your manao …
    Looking forward to the day of the big HULI of the occupation…
    Praying and asking for that day to come soon…
    Again Mahalo Tane

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